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Harmony Day – Everybody Belongs

Harmony Day – Everybody Belongs

Harmony Day is a day to celebrate Australian multiculturalism. It is a day of celebration and cultural respect for anyone who calls Australia home, from the traditional owners of this land to those who have come from many countries around the world.

This year’s theme is EVERYBODY BELONGS. Harmony Week is about inclusiveness, respect and belonging for all Australians, regardless of cultural or linguistic background, united by a set of core Australian values.

The College celebrated Harmony Day today with a host of different activities for students to engage in. At recess, the girls enjoyed an international food stall, guest speakers and a live music performance by our very own Greek star, Mr Kes!

At lunch, the girls were able to try kangaroo stew, participate in activities and games and enjoy some more live performances from students and staff.

All proceeds from the day will go to Project Compassion.We asked one of our guest speakers, Lisa Fieldhouse, about the day and what it means to her.

What is your role?
I am the Aboriginal Liaison Officer at AISWA Future Footprints, which is a cultural navigator, empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to code switch between school life and home life and supporting their cultural wellbeing. I also connect the dots between people, communities, organisations and schools. I also provide cultural awareness to schools and staff, so they have a great understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

What does Harmony Day mean to you?
Harmony Day is about celebrating what makes each culture special and unique. It is an opportunity to create a deeper understanding and appreciation of different cultures.

How can we be more inclusive of Indigenous students at Santa Maria College?
Santa Maria College, as with most of society, can be more inclusive of Aboriginal and Torres Islander people by celebrating the traditions and learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Islander culture. Learning about Aboriginal and Torres Islander protocols, creates positive interaction and helps prevents misunderstanding.

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