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Inspiring Our Students for Change

Inspiring Our Students for Change

Strive9 is a service-based project and a part of the Enhanced Learning Program at Santa Maria College. It is an opportunity for Year 9 students to work together in Homeroom groups in order to activate change in the community.

The project is student-driven and develops the skills of collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking. It also enhances emotional and social growth, by taking students away from the comfort of traditional teacher-led learning and engaging in acts of service. 

The College is very proud of their achievements and the input of a number of alumni who assisted the girls with the projects. It is amazing to see what the impact these young students along with our alumni are having in society.

Year 9 De La Hoyde collected goods for disadvantaged children at the Perth Children’s Hospital. Anne Marie Juengling (Wlliams, 2005) works at the hospital and came to talk to the students at the College about how some children arrive at the hospital and have absolutely nothing. This inspired the students to collect bags, toiletries, games, and toys for the PCH to distribute to children and families most in need.

Year 9 Kelly decided to support the work of Homelessness We Care. Jane Armstrong (1993) came to talk with girls about this issue and about working with this organisation. Students donated and collected a variety of items and made up over 40 hand–made bags filled with personal care items to be distributed by Homelessness We Care.

Year 9 O’Donnell partnered with Catrina Luz Aniere who attended SMC in primary school. Catrina is from Millennium Kids Inc which is an organisation that encourages young people, regardless of race, religion, or social capital to explore, identify and address environmental and sustainability issues in the local, regional and global communities. 

Through this project, the girls traveled to Bicton Baths and Leighton Beach and developed a social love and care for the ocean and waterways. The students hope the findings from their project help future generations to deal with pollution issues on a larger global scale.

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