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Just Leadership Launch Project Compassion

Just Leadership Launch Project Compassion

What is the Just Leadership Group?

Just Leadership is a Year 9 service co-curricular group.  Students get to be more involved in the school, without having an official leadership role.

The group’s goal is to make a difference in the school environment and the wider community. 

Our members:

  • attend regular meetings
  • raise awareness about social justice issues
  • fundraise for appeals and service days
  • show compassion and understanding for those less fortunate in our society.
  • create new and interesting ways of promoting and getting people involved in service at the College

Caritas Project Compassion Launch

The Just Leadership group recently attended the Caritas Project Compassion launch. It was a chance for us to discover more about our role as children of God. We saw how we can reach our full potential by serving others and genuinely caring about those less fortunate.

The Caritas Workshop on how we as a community can become more aware of others’ hardship. By using our talents, we can break down barriers for the poor.

From pancakes with Maple Syrup to juice boxes and comfy seats in a large theatre, the event saw us walk away empowered and enthused.

What I learnt

My biggest take away from the workshop was the impact Caritas Australia has on the lives of so many. After watching two of six stories to be launched throughout 2020s Lenten Season, and hearing so many powerful words spoken, we felt glad that such a hardworking and dedicated organisation was willing to collect necessary resources to aid the sick, uneducated and abused.

In particular, one phrase resonated with me:

the need to not always delight in happiness, as through this, we can disregard others’ sorrow.

At first, this suggestion seemed quite strange, but it makes sense.

When happy, we seldom think about those that aren’t, but rather enjoy the moment for what it’s worth. The gist of this was not to question joy, but rather to help others feel the same. The opposite works just as well. When we camp outside in only a tent or go without food for a few hours longer than normal, we feel what millions of beings experience every single day of their lives. Not only are children seen as slaves, walking miles for water each day, but women and girls alike are also denied education or a proper job to support their family.

For people living in such extreme poverty, you would think that small differences such as colour, religion or gender don’t matter as much. Unfortunately, it is very much the opposite, Indigenous peoples of countries such as the Philippines are often refused basic things: from proper health care to public transport (often sitting on the roofs of buses on even the longest of journeys). The school’s ongoing connection to faith is truly important in raising awareness for people such as these. 

The presenter spoke of the importance of following Jesus’ footsteps and reiterated Jesus’ message for us all:

‘For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you? The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’

Sophia Marra, Year 9 O’Donnell

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